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DVR EXPRESS CORE 2 MAX GPS OPTION

15940 Robin’s Hill Rd, London, Ontario N5V 0A4, CANADA

T. +1 (519) 663-9570

E. sales@ioindustries.com

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Supported Constellations

Supported Frequencies

Receiver

Description

GPS

GLONASS

BEIDOU

L1

L2

B1

B2

G01

Entry-level GPS receiver, L1, 1Hz

X



X




G02

Entry-level GPS/GLONASS receiver, L1, 1Hz

X

X


X




G03

GPS receiver, L1, 20Hz

X



X




G04

GPS/GLONASS receiver, L1, 20Hz

X

X


X




G05

GPS/BEIDOU receiver, L1/B1, 20Hz

X


X

X


X


G06

GPS/GLONASS/BEIDOU receiver, L1/B1, 20Hz

X

X

X

X


X


G07

GPS receiver, L1/L2, 20Hz

X



X

X



G08

GPS/GLONASS receiver, L1/L2, 20Hz

X

X


X

X



G09

GPS/BEIDOU receiver, L1/L2/B1/B2, 20Hz

X


X

X

X

X

X

G10

GPS/GLONASS/BEIDOU receiver, L1/L2/B1/B2, 20Hz

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

RECEIVER

G01-G02

G03-G10

GPS Timing Accuracy

20ns RMS

20ns RMS

Position Accuracy

L1: 1.5m, SBAS: 0.6m

L1: 1.5m, L1/L2: 1.2m, SBAS: 0.6m

Channels

14

120

Signal Reacquisition

L1: 1.0s

L1: 0.5s / L2: 1.0s

Time to First Fix

Cold: 65s / Hot: 35s

Cold: 50s / Hot: 35s

Data Rate

1Hz

20Hz

Video Timestamp Accuracy

 +/- 4μs

 +/- 1μs

GNSS (Global Satellite Navigation System):

GNSS refers to any satellite-based geo-spatial positioning system.  A GNSS constellation involves multiple satellites orbiting over the Earth with the ability to transmit signals to an Earth-based receiver.  Once the receiver “locks” to enough satellites, it can accurately determine its current position and time.  Depending on the number of satellites and their distribution, coverage of a GNSS can be global or region-specific.


GPS (Global Positioning System):

GPS is a GNSS with global coverage operated by the U.S. Department of Defense.   The constellation includes 31 satellites using two frequencies referred to as L1 and L2.


GLONASS (Global Navigation Satellite System):

GLONASS is a GNSS with global coverage operated by Russia, with comparable precision to GPS.  The constellation includes 24 satellites using two frequencies referred to as L1 and L2.  GLONASS' orbit makes it especially suited for usage in high latitudes (north or south), where locking to a GPS signal can be problematic.


BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS):

BDS is a GNSS with regional coverage operated by China.  The constellation includes 21 satellites that cover the Asia-Pacific region. Future plans include expansion to 30 satellites by 2020, allowing global coverage.  Two frequencies are used - B1 and B2.


Receiver:

A GNSS receiver is a hardware option available when ordering a Core 2 MAX digital video recorder.  When paired with an appropriate antenna and RF cable (sold separately) this device receives and digitally processes signals from GNSS satellites.  Depending on the selected receiver, one or more frequencies from one or more constellations (including GPS, GLONASS and BDS) can be received.  This results in an accurate time reference for the timestamps applied to all video frames during recording.  As well, a stream of accurate position data (up to 20 updates per second), can be recorded along with the video.


GPS Timing Accuracy:

Refers to the accuracy of the precise clock used by the GNSS receiver.


Position Accuracy:

Refers to the accuracy of the position data determined by the receiver.  Typically stated as a radius, the position accuracy can be improved from the basic single-frequency accuracy by the use of additional frequencies and/or support for additional GNSS constellations.  As well, further improvements can be had with the use of correction services such as SBAS.


SBAS (Satellite-based Augmentation System):

A system that provides correction data to GNSS receivers to further improve position accuracy.  A system may provide correction information applicable to a wide area or a smaller regional area.  Multiple ground stations, located at accurately-surveyed points,

receive GNSS signals and calculate the position error.  This is transmitted to a satellite network which then broadcasts the data

to any SBAS-capable receivers.  An example SBAS is the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) operated by the U.S. Federal

Aviation Administration.


Channels:

A GNSS receiver searches for satellites on multiple signal channels simultaneously, attempting to lock to as many satellites as possible to compute the best solution for the position of the receiver.  The number of channels a receiver supports affects how fast the receiver can lock to enough satellites to achieve a solution, as well as the Time to First Fix and Signal Reacquisition rates.


Signal Reacquisition:

The time it takes a GNSS receiver to lock to satellite signals after a complete loss of all signals for a short period of time.


Time to First Fix:

The time it takes a GNSS receiver to produce a first position solution.


Data Rate:

The frequency of time and position messages transmitted by the receiver to the Core 2 MAX video recorder.  A higher sampling rate leads to better position accuracy, especially for mobile applications, and a higher video timestamp accuracy for all situations.


Video Timestamp Accuracy:

Refers to the accuracy of the timestamps applied to all video frames during recording, relative to GPS time, when the receiver is locked.  With no GPS receiver installed, the timestamp clock of the Core 2 MAX is initialized to the time of the connected PC, then experiences drift throughout operation.  With a GPS receiver, the timestamp clock is updated continuously (at a rate equal to the  receiver's data rate), reducing total drift over time to the maximum drift between an update period.

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GPS Options Available:

Common Features:

Quick Reference:

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